Posts in category Marijuana

Washington State Marijuana Laws

How well do you know the Washington State Marijuana Laws?  It’s important to be safe and avoid any criminal prosecution, so let’s review the laws pertaining to legalized marijuana.

Washington State Marijuana Laws

1.  It is legal for any individual of the age of 21 or older to buy marijuana from a licensed recreational marijuana retail store.  Individuals 21 years and older may legally possess and use:

  • 1 once of marijuana bud/flower,Washington State Marijuana Laws - marijuana light bulb
  • or 7 grams of marijuana concentrate/extract for inhalation,
  • or 16 ounces of marijuana infused product in solid form,
  • or 72 ounces of marijuana infused product in liquid form
  • marijuana related drug paraphernalia

2.  It is illegal to possess more marijuana than what is listed above and it is illegal to possess any form of marijuana or drug paraphernalia if an individual is under 21 years old.

  • FUN FACT – Washington State recreational marijuana sales to the public began July, 8 2014.

3.  Growing marijuana at home for recreational use or to sell is illegal.  Individuals must purchase marijuana from a licensed recreational retail store.

  • FUN FACT – According to the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Control Board, the marijuana industry generated over $64 million dollars in tax revenue during its first fiscal year.

4.  Marijuana purchased in Washington State must be consumed in Washington State, it is illegal to transport marijuana to other states.

5.  Individuals from other states are allowed to purchase marijuana in Washington State as long as they are 21 or older and they must consume the product in Washington State, they cannot take it back to their home state.

6.  Purchased marijuana products cannot be consumed in the retail store, it is illegal.  This includes concentrates, edibles, and the bud/flower.

7.  It is illegal to open and/or consume any type of marijuana products in the view of the general public.  If law enforcement see’s an individual opening and/or consuming any type of marijuana product in public, that officer is first required to give the offender a verbal warning.  It the individual does not abide by the officer’s warning, the officer will then issue a $27.00 fine.

8.  It is illegal to drive under the influence of marijuana.  There is a per se DUI limit of “delta-9” THC levels at greater than or equal to 5 nanograms per milliliter of blood (5 ng/mL).  If an individual is driving under the influence of marijuana they could be charged with DUI.  A marijuana DUI is treated the same as an alcohol related DUI. State and local law enforcement agencies are tasked with enforcing the DUI limit.

If you have any further questions about Washington State marijuana laws, DUI marijuana laws, or if you have been charged with a marijuana DUI, the attorneys at David O Defense are here to help.  Give us a call, 206-459-6392, today.

 

Lawmakers Want Tougher DUI Laws

Roger Goodman, Democratic Representative of Kirkland, is heading House Bill 1276 that is aimed at toughening DUI laws.  Goodman suggests that Bill 1276 fills DUI law gaps and will strengthen current drunk driving laws.  According to lawmakers, the bill’s primary goal is to keep roads safe and to detour repeat DUI offenders.

A lot of different areas of DUI laws are covered in the lengthy bill, with several of the proposals focused on improving the existing ignition interlock devise laws;

  • — Requiring the courts to notify the Department of Licensing when a defendant is required to use an ignition interlock device (IID) and notifying officials when restrictions are lifted and;
  • — Requiring an IID restricted driver, who has agreed not to drive, to sign an affidavit of non-driving, which must be filed with the court.

Another area of the proposal deals with the marijuana open container law;

  • — Making it a traffic infraction for a person to have an open container of marijuana in the main compartment of a vehicle. (The marijuana must be in a closed sealed container from a 502 retailer, and if the marijuana is in a broken sealed container or a non 502 container than the individual shall be cited with a traffic infraction).

At a public hearing held days ago, many legal professionals suggested the bill needs revising and reworking in order to be effective.  Bill 1276 is scheduled to be presented at an executive session of the House Committee on Public Safety next Friday

 

The Washington State Patrol releases “Drive High, Get a DUI” Campaign

Last month, the Washington State Patrol began their new campaign, “Drive High, Get a DUI,” to educate the public that it is illegal to drive under the influence of marijuana.  The slogan, “Drive High, Get A DUI” was written to be straight forward and clear, warning drivers that if they are under the influence of marijuana while driving than they could be arrested and charged with DUI.  The campaign officially began on July 1st to coincide with the first day marijuana retail stores opened their doors to the general public.

While marijuana seems to be the primary focus of the campaign, “Drive High, Get A DUI” also applies to other drugs and substances that produce a high effect.  “We see a lot of folks that are impaired by glue, by paint, by prescription and non prescription medication,” said Washington State Trooper, Jeff Sevigney.  Any driver that is under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, drugs, and/or substances could be arrested and charged with DUI.  “The bottom line is don’t drive while you’re impaired,” warns Trooper Sevigney.

In effort to enforce the campaign, Washington State law enforcement agencies have increased their officer training programs to help them better identify individuals that are under the influence of marijuana, drugs, and/or substances.  The sheer number of troopers and patrol units on the streets has also been increased and will be maintained throughout the summer.

“Procedures are still the same.  Troopers are looking for drivers that are under the influence,” explains Trooper Sevigney. “We recommend that you don’t carry it in your vehicle because if I smell marijuana in your vehicle I’m going to instantly make sure nobody is impaired while they’re driving,” said Sevigney.

If charged with a marijuana, drug, or substance DUI, the consequences are the same as an alcohol related DUI, which include possible jail time, monetary fines and fees, and loss of driver’s license.

Contact the experienced DUI lawyers at David O Defense if you have been charged with a DUI, 206-459-6392, the legal consultation is free.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

Seattle Space Needle, Seattle Sculpture Park

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